8:00 PM
Tue Nov 12

Opening Night

We'll Be Your Mirror

Tue Nov 12 @8:00 PM

Queerdos of New York: Welcome to the Funhouse. The MIX Factory reflects what you are. Hello, lover-army of fringe-dwelling geniuses! Hello, queers building community! Hello, destroyers of mainstream mediocrity! Whatever you are, let’s come together to reflect and enjoy immersive bodily experiences. We must also, sadly, reflect the world we live in. It’s no secret we live in a nightmare surveillance state that conducts robo-drone-massacres while it poisons the planet. The films this year show sites of resistance to ever-escalating police and state-corporate power, both at home [This Leak] and abroad [Bradley Manning Had Secrets]. But our mirror is wonky: it bends inward and gathers light [I Told Her This Was Home, What I Want - What I Have] then shoots a deathray back out [Chromatic Cocktail, The Memory of Objects]. Sometimes it’s flattering, and shows you gorgeous things to look at [Shift, Hoshi Neko]. And other times, it trolls the morons listening in. [Jimmy Carter and Balls].

6:00 PM
Wed Nov 13

SMORGASBORD

Wed Nov 13 @6:00 PM

This collection of films and videos presents a wide and diverse range of topics and subjects that includes class and racism, the relationship between mental illness and blindness, HIV and AIDS, subconscious experimentation, trans parenting and awareness, porn and procreation, and of course humour. Conspicuously Canadian, these shorts offer up a well balanced diet of current and ongoing ingredients from the fertile minds of established and up and coming media art chefs. An eight-course reel meal—this program starts with a few appetizers, gets meaty, throws in a few palate cleansers along the way, and finishes with a yummy dessert. Challenging, satisfying, nourishing, healthy and nice to look at—this cinematic spread will make you feel good inside and out.

7:30 PM
Wed Nov 13

Afro-Asian Visions

Exploding Lineage II!

Wed Nov 13 @7:30 PM

What histories do we inherit, and what do we need to create? Queer Rebels is thrilled to return after our 2012 MIX NYC debut. Afrofuturism. The Asian avant-garde. Genderqueer love. Anarchy. Ancestral trauma. These films reflect the past and imagine our collective future.

Queer Rebels is a production company founded by KB Boyce and Celeste Chan (www.queerrebels.com). Queer Rebels Productions (QRP) showcases queer artists of color, connects generations and honors our histories with art for the future.

9:30 PM
Wed Nov 13

LAST DANCE

Dirty Looks at the End of Days

Wed Nov 13 @9:30 PM

This is how the world ends? Dirty Looks NYC returns to MIX with a program that queers our Armageddon via explosive clip art, 16mm educational films, hypnosis, and, yes, Madonna. Radio frequencies orchestrate a din of broadcast conspiracies as A.K. Burns hangs in the balance by an S&M harness. Nao Bustamante trains her lens on Joshua Thorson, who, in turn, grapples with a pesky tween neighbor destined to star in his post-apocalyptic film, while Michael Robinson weaves meaning through the words of V.C. Andrews, William S. Burroughs, Shirley Jackson and Stevie Nicks on some lonely tropical isle. This is the end, via subtlety, screen savers and sublimation. Stand back.

7:30 PM
Thu Nov 14

CinemaScopeS

Thu Nov 14 @7:30 PM

Throughout history, innovations in media have had profound impacts on the way we see the world. When Johann Gutenberg perfected the printing press in the 1430s, an unprecedented amount of information could then be recorded and transmitted across the “Old World.” Books were no longer a luxury of the rich, and mass-produced texts allowed a horizontal distribution of knowledge. Suddenly, European nations didn’t seem so far apart—one could explore different lives, lands, and ways of being without ever leaving a library. The role of the printing press in making the world seem smaller illustrates how the perception of our surroundings changes with each innovation in media. Our realities are constantly shifting with new ways to perceive life in different media, be it maps or film.

It is with this spirit that CinemaScopeS features a series of films that challenge our perspectives of our environment. Each film in this program combines media invention with abstract poeticism to present viewers with new realities. Some films highlight technological innovations in cinema, such as Chromatic Cocktail’s 3D adventure, Locale’s microscopic lens, or the exciting camera-less work in Two Lakes. Other films deconstruct the supposed rigidity of physical space by presenting commonplace sceneries with contorted, twisted, and cubic alterations [Activated Memory I, Recreation]. Some films are so bold as to disavow normative conceptions of time by illustrating how the past bleeds into the present [Memory of Objects] or by expanding our scopic register of time’s passing [Im Freien]. After this program, you’ll never be able to see your surroundings the same way again.

9:00 PM
Thu Nov 14

A Stom Sogo Tribute

Film on Film

Thu Nov 14 @9:00 PM

FEATURING SLOW DEATH
AND XXX SURPRISES!
ALL ON SUPER-8

“[A] movie’s reality should be as nasty and fucked up as possible, so we want to get fuck out of the theater and hope for something better in life…. I try not to have a message or even word in my movie. But I usually have some sick stories behind each of the movies. Those are just mental eye candy that it taste sweet first, seizure second.” —Stom Sogo

A dynamo whose thunderous potential was cut short by his premature death, Japanese moving-image artist Stom Sogo (1975-2012) remains a romantic rebel if ever there was one. For over two decades he created a hair-raising body of aggressively beautiful films and videos. This 70-minute program features the acclaimed film SLOW DEATH and the rest is, well, a surprise. As we type, tons of new and enticing discoveries are being made in the boxes of over 1200 films, videos and tapes that Sogo left behind. Did we just find a 400-foot reel mysteriously titled 20 CENTURY PORNO? How many abstract adaptations of Dennis Cooper novels did Stom make? We are carefully opening hundreds of envelopes of unknown film reels and you just won’t believe what we have found. This all Super-8 program will feature films projected on film, the way that Stom used to show them during his bacchanalian all-night screenings.

A prolific creator and a devoted experimentalist, Sogo often began with Super-8 or mini-DV and constantly renewed his works with hybrid electronic remixes. With each step, the material achieved a higher level of intensity, sometimes to the point of self-destruction. His distinctive, psychically charged work revels in optic and aural jolts just as much as it attempts a sincere connection with the viewer. While he mastered numerous approaches, his primary technique involved heavy amounts of re-photography, a process that allowed him to fashion multiple electrified layers of strobing imagery. Other pieces demonstrate his uncanny editing prowess in their startling juxtaposition of home movies with materials taken from an expansive array of unlikely sources. As overtly poetic and autobiographical as they are often fiercely abstract, Sogo’s works do not shy away from exploring visual and sonic extremes. From his speedy and spectacular early diaries to his painstakingly rendered late digital manipulations, his extensive personal archive now resides at Anthology Film Archives.

Sogo was a standout in MoMA’s landmark 8mm BIG AS LIFE survey, the 2002 Whitney Biennial, multiple editions of the New York Underground Film Festival and many other exhibitions. Born and raised in Osaka, he came to the U.S. for high school and eventually landed in NYC where he started working at Anthology Film Archives. Truly a catalyst in every sense of the word, Sogo’s inexhaustible energy and inspiration helped kick open the doors to a younger generation of artists and fellow travelers. He moved to San Francisco in the early 2000s before returning to Brooklyn, and eventually Japan where he remained until his death in July 2012.

Films by Stom Sogo have been provided courtesy of Anthology Film Archives. Special thanks to Yukiko and Ai Sogo.

10:30 PM
Thu Nov 14

Viscera

Thu Nov 14 @10:30 PM

Let’s take a short break from identities, discourse, gender, and representation to examine the sweaty, stinky and tender fleshiness of our bodies. Viscera, along with the MIX Factory design team—as you’ll notice in your immediate surroundings—is paying special attention to the queer body and its innermost faculties. This program enacts a certain cartography, focusing on particular aspects of the flesh to provide viewers with a whirling impression of the queer body’s possibilities. Some films deal with trauma, self-care and historical violence [Fluff Film; Bang Bang]. Some present the flesh as an interchangeable object that bolsters intimate companionship [Shift; Beyond the Mirror’s Gaze; 60 Unit: Bruise]. Others celebrate and challenge our perspectives of the body by presenting a confusing mess of fluids, flesh and artifice [Body of Others; A Pair of Hands and a Pair of Breasts; Balls; Dishonored Bodies]. This program touches on many actions and aspects of the body: gender, fucking, violence, intimacy, self-care, and reinvention—but it does so by centering on materiality: skin, hair, sweat, blood, and scars. It’s sexy, tender, frightening, confusing and celebratory—as each aspect of the flesh can evoke a different feeling for the audience.

6:15 PM
Fri Nov 15

I Like Quiet, Dark Places

Fri Nov 15 @6:15 PM

I Like Quiet, Dark Places features films that identify limits set to confine us. This is not designed to make you, dearest viewer, feel trapped and asphyxiated by society. Rather, we seek to show how confinement can be subverted, reimagined, and toppled. Some films, for example, wrestle notions of identity categories and expose them for limiting our imaginations of gender and sexuality [Pigeon Hole, Dating Sucks]. Other films uncover how the psyche deals with isolation [Benjamin’s Flowers, Tord & Tord] and incarceration [Black with Smoke, Bradley Manning Had Secrets]. Last we include films that show how self-imposed barriers can be fun instruments used to reclaim public space [At Last, 20 Sekunden]. Let’s imagine together the full range of our motions once our limits have been demolished.

7:30 PM
Fri Nov 15

Big Joy

The Adventures of James Broughton

Fri Nov 15 @7:30 PM

An energetic doc that explores the art and sexual adventures of early independent filmmaker James Broughton. While few moviegoers will know the name of James Broughton—a poet and experimental filmmaker—he played a role in creating the indie film scene that flourishes today, especially at film festivals.

UnionDocs (UnDo) is a Center for Documentary Art that generates and shares big ideas.

Located at 322 Union Avenue, between Maujer and Tan Eyck. L to Lorimer. Tickets available at door.

8:00 PM
Fri Nov 15

The Queer’s Throat

Fri Nov 15 @8:00 PM

Vocal breaks sound the moments where gender itself breaks down, when expectations of alignment between voice and gender are thwarted, and we begin to wonder whether the categories of ‘male’ and ‘female’ can even be applied. —Judith A. Peraino, Listening to Gender.

A conversation on the queer dimensions of the voice and its gendered norms, informed by The Queen’s Throat, Wayne Koestenbaum’s examination that looks to physicality, sound, and ideology of voice in order to expose the different ways in which the voice marks identity and shores up gender. Koestenbaum identifies the voice’s breaks as sites of transgression and the inherent queerness. The films explore the different ways a voice can break: in song, in transforming biologies, and in different zones of class and nationality. The Break tells the story of several transgender vocalists reckoning with the gender of their voices, while an autobiography from Singapore-born male mezzo Stephen Chen [Doh! Oh Dear, A Female Tear!] speaks to being silenced in two languages. Out Loud and MeTube visualize the imaginative power of the voice on its speakers and surroundings, while Portrait of a Young Man expands the concept of the voice beyond what is spoken.

9:30 PM
Fri Nov 15

BURN

Moving Images by Cabaret Artists

Fri Nov 15 @9:30 PM

For performers perennially working on a shoestring, cheap DV has opened up new dimensions of the imagination. Created in 2010 by Time Out London cabaret editor and film critic Ben Walters, BURN is a platform for video dispatches from London’s underground cabaret scene, featuring music, comedy, documentary and experimental work from the likes of Jonny Woo, Dickie Beau, A Man to Pet, Alp Haydar, Bryony Kimmings, Scottee and David Hoyle. In this hot-mess sampler, they turn drag upside down and gender inside out; explore sexuality and self-esteem in Manchester, Wood Green and Fuckingham Palace; enjoy domestic pleasures from cooking and cleaning to Chatroulette and light scat; create tributes to Warhol, direct and indirect; revel in apocalyptic exuberance; and bear witness to a fine affair that now is over. Don’t forget—it is beautiful, no matter what they say.

11:00 PM
Fri Nov 15

Gnostic Trance

Fri Nov 15 @11:00 PM

Shamans attained trans-dimensional experience by inducing states of heightened perception accomplished by various methods. Extreme psychic stimulation or conditions of spiritual ecstasy could be enhanced by modes such as drug use, sexual arousal, physical pain, or dance.

Conversely effective were the opposite extremes: sensory deprivation, meditation, trance.

The ritualistic nature of cinema is a potent means of enchantment, with its language of symbols, its use of sound and tempo, its capacity to engulf the psyche. The emblematic properties of film to rouse fear, lust, desire, or disgust align with the shamanistic tradition of supernatural levels of experience by deliberate induction. The filmmaker uses his craft to transcend the intellect and address the subconscious directly, the very essence of ritual magic.

Gnostic Trance, originally curated by artist and occultist Micki Pellerano at Envoy Enterprises NYC, explores the power of cinema as a vehicle to generate psychic atmospheres of either polarity, thus examining the possibilities of the medium to heighten human consciousness and potential through symbol, ritual, and the derangement of the senses.

4:00 PM
Sat Nov 16

Cage in Search of Bird

Sat Nov 16 @4:00 PM

Taking its title from one of Kafka’s aphorisms, Cage in Search of Bird probes the call for home and belonging within the Queer Diaspora. Though the term sounds academic, LGBTQ artists have been exploring these issues long before academics have provided critical theories on the intersections of queerness and diasporic communities. We have always found creative ways to come together as a community, to colonize spaces and through that, connect with our own identity.

6:00 PM
Sat Nov 16

White Walls or Warehouses

Art’s Community & Commodity

Sat Nov 16 @6:00 PM

What is art? Where does it come from? Why do we keep having to rehash these problems? Calm, cool and collected people don’t stress out over questions they can’t answer. But artists are rarely cool that way—high-strung-edness is wed to the sensitivity that compels creation, right? We’re going to keep asking these questions, and we’re going to keep drafting new answers for them (answers that will, in turn, harden into clichés and then themselves have to be destroyed, but that’s the Future’s problem, hence the parentheses). Please, my queercore punks, put away your daggers; soapboxing can be fun. Altered Lives and Cuki Colorinichi are enjoying themselves, and making fun of us, possibly. Tartaglia and Geyer make more self-serious work, but the attention paid to their film’s image melted away our cynicism, while Obruni Papa’s pop veneer doesn’t hide its questions about privilege and collaboration.

8:00 PM
Sat Nov 16

Not Me, Murphy

Sat Nov 16 @8:00 PM

According to the project’s Kickstarter, Not Me, Murphy tells the “simple” story of a man with dissociative identity disorder. It’s part spiritual journey and part case study, narrated by Murphy’s care-taking girlfriend Lynn. After a visit from her odd-ball mother, Lynn leaves Murphy, prompting him to take to the country with Brad, a mutual friend. Out in nature, surrounded by gun enthusiasts, their awkward-charming journey takes an unexpected turn.

10:00 PM
Sat Nov 16

It’s Going to Be a Humpy Night

Sat Nov 16 @10:00 PM

This 12-course appetizer will nourish the thirstings of many holes. As we sit at the table with our chosen loves and passing strangers, our fervent glances will give way to tender cannibalisms—you won’t know where your body ends and the food begins. Savoring both metal and mango, rubber and rectum. The main course begins after the show, with breakfast at sunrise.

12:00 AM
Sun Nov 17

Feed Your Head

Sun Nov 17 @12:00 AM

When logic and proportion
Have fallen sloppy dead
And the white knight is talking backwards
And the Red Queen’s “Off with her head!”
Remember what the dormouse said…
—Grace Slick, “White Rabbit” c. 1966

Reality appears to have no logic as one careens toward an existential crisis. This collection of trippy, ‘turned on/tuned in’ transgressive films will dazzle, amuse, challenge and enlighten… and perhaps, even induce a psychedelic experience. These filmmakers will lead you down the rabbit hole. All you have to do is come along for the long ride. ‘It’s midnight at the oasis,’ but it’s also no better time to gather in front of the screen for this magical mystery tour.

3:00 PM
Sun Nov 17

Fasten Your Seatbelts…

Sun Nov 17 @3:00 PM

Queers have a special relationship with film. Cinema has provided us with images, not necessarily of ourselves, but models of who we could be. Camp could exist on screen when it couldn’t on the streets of small-town-America. Margo Channing could be the audacious public stand-in for the closeted and repressed gay man. Lesbians, or suspiciously lesbian-like characters, could look like Lauren Bacall and be brash like Barbara Stanwyck. Fabulousness was possible. We found ourselves in the movies and we understood ourselves a little more. Cinema was pop-culture identity politics, empowering the oppressed and giving way to consciousness-raising.

This program of films reflects the inspiration and the impact of movies, literature, and pop-culture on queer artists and like the parent inspiration before them, these films will dazzle the senses. It’s going to be a bumpy night.

5:00 PM
Sun Nov 17

Craftivism

Sun Nov 17 @5:00 PM

Queerness, feminism, and craft go hand in hand for many of these emerging contemporary artists, as they rethink and reclaim craft in their own unique ways. Sit back and let these artists take you on a voyage through their meticulously crafted queer universes. From Paris, we have Igor Dewe’s fabulous sand castle high heels, from Baltimore we have Rachael Shannon’s giant welcoming inflatable Breastival Vestibule and from California we have Mev Luna’s mint and lavender weaving, with their own body chroma keyed and rustling through it. From LA we have Jeepney’s mystical costume crafted journey into the unknown. Each artist brings their own distinct voice full of personal politics, her/they/his/tories and private passions to their filmmaking, resulting in diverse practices and methodologies—all of which aggrandize our communities. The transformative combination of humour and desire are also explored with Caitlin Rose and Kailey Bryan’s surprising fresh creations. Craft itself is politicized, as it is constantly marginalized in the institutions which seek to exclude or re-name it. Crafting, therefore, is an outsider art, a rebellion against the establishment who does not want to accept it. Do we want entrance to the establishment? Do we want acceptance within their institutions? Many of us have been creating our own feminist queer international networks and communities for over a decade and will continue to do so for years to come.

7:30 PM
Sun Nov 17

Valencia

Sun Nov 17 @7:30 PM

Valencia is the most masterful dyke-centric artsy-weirdo film I’ve ever seen.”—Autostraddle

 Twenty queer filmmakers combine forces to create Valencia: The Movie/s, an ambitious project/experiment from author Michelle Tea and producer Hilary Goldberg. With the book Valencia as their muse, filmmakers worked separately on their own given chapter. The resulting short films were then pulled together to form an epic feature-length adaptation of the novel. As much as it is specifically about 1990’s San Francisco sex radical dyke culture, Valencia: The Movie/s also speaks beautifully about love, queer politics, and alienation, accompanied by a soundtrack of vintage queercore and alt-rock tracks by bands like Team Dresch, Bratmobile, Tribe 8, Bikini Kill and Pansy Division.

 Contrasts and variations in artistic choices from chapter to chapter highlight differences in casting, style and interpretation. The distributed yet collective process adds multiple layers of insights and perspectives to an already complex and emotional story.

 MIX is thrilled to close our 26th film festival with the NYC premier of this huge, multi-gendered interpretation of a dyke classic rendered through queer community collaboration!

10:00 PM
Sun Nov 17

Valencia (Encore Screening)

Sun Nov 17 @10:00 PM

WE’VE ADDED A SECOND SCREENING OF VALENCIA, DUE TO POPULAR DEMAND 

Valencia is the most masterful dyke-centric artsy-weirdo film I’ve ever seen.”—Autostraddle

 Twenty queer filmmakers combine forces to create Valencia: The Movie/s, an ambitious project/experiment from author Michelle Tea and producer Hilary Goldberg. With the book Valencia as their muse, filmmakers worked separately on their own given chapter. The resulting short films were then pulled together to form an epic feature-length adaptation of the novel. As much as it is specifically about 1990’s San Francisco sex radical dyke culture, Valencia: The Movie/s also speaks beautifully about love, queer politics, and alienation, accompanied by a soundtrack of vintage queercore and alt-rock tracks by bands like Team Dresch, Bratmobile, Tribe 8, Bikini Kill and Pansy Division.

 Contrasts and variations in artistic choices from chapter to chapter highlight differences in casting, style and interpretation. The distributed yet collective process adds multiple layers of insights and perspectives to an already complex and emotional story.

 MIX is thrilled to close our 26th film festival with the NYC premier of this huge, multi-gendered interpretation of a dyke classic rendered through queer community collaboration!